Category Archives: Activities

New Lake Champlain Blueway Trail Guide Available Online

New Lake Champlain Blueway Trail Guide Available

New Lake Champlain Blueway Trail Guide Available Online

 

A recreational water path extending the length of Lake Champlain’s New York shoreline from Whitehall to Rouses Point, the Lake Champlain Blueway Trail is a guide for paddlers featuring more than 90 points of interests including: parks, wildlife viewing spots, geological curiosities, historic sites, museums, and campgrounds.

Explore the Lake Champlain Adirondack Coast through the Lake Champlain Blueway Trail. This online travel guide provides historical information, recreational opportunities, paddling tips, boat launches, docking locations, and marinas.

Intended primarily for use by paddlers, it can also be used by those in larger boats and those who travel frozen Lake Champlain in the winter. The Blueway Trail is organized into 16 segments, each intended as a separate day trip.

The entire Blueway Trail Guide can be found online at Blueway Trail Guide. Each of the sections is explored briefly below. You may also access each of the sections individually by clicking the name of that section below.

Rouses Point to the Great Chazy River:

Lake Champlain History - Fort Montgomery (Fort Blunder)

Fort Montgomery (Fort Blunder)

 

Before you begin, north of the Village of Rouses Point is Fort Montgomery, nicknamed Fort Blunder.

Start in the Village of Rouses Point and continue down and around the historic Point au Fer. From here, paddlers have an uninterrupted view down the lake following the marshy shore. At Kings Bay Wildlife Management Area, you can observe the abundant wildlife up to the mouth of the Great Chazy River.

Great Chazy River to Point au Roche:

Snow geese at Montys Bay Wildlife Management Area

Snow geese at Montys Bay WMA

Along this shallow and marshy shoreline, paddlers will pass historic Chazy Landing and have access to Montys Bay Wildlife Management Area for wildlife viewing, hunting, and fishing.

Point au Roche to Cumberland Head:

Point Au Roche Lighthouse

Point Au Roche Lighthouse

Paddlers can enjoy the view of the Point Au Roche Lighthouse, a series of beautiful bays, and have access to Point Au Roche State Park with its sandy beach, swimming area, and network of trails.

 

Port Kent to Cumberland Bay:

This Lake Champlain Blueway Trail route begins in Port Kent and continues through two different wildlife management areas, Wickham Marsh WMA and Ausable Marsh WMA, both of which offer excellent wetland wildlife viewing opportunities. This segment is “hallowed waters,” the site of several naval battles that were fought to control Lake Champlain over 200 years ago. The route ends at the Plattsburgh City Beach, which is adjacent to Cumberland Bay State Park. Recommended to paddle from south to north.

 

Valcour and Crab Islands:

The Valcour and Crab islands trail guides you around one of Lake Champlain’s largest and most historic islands and its smaller neighbor. Explore the many bays and points along the islands. You can also learn about the best places to explore the islands on foot at this PassagePort. Valcour has a number of primitive campsites.

 

Port Kent to Willsboro:

Schuyler Island - Lake Champlain Islands

Schuyler Island pebble beach

Begin this paddle in the hamlet of Port Kent, explore Schuyler Island, and continues south to the historic hamlet of Port Douglas, where you will find a sandy beach and swimming area before continuing on to Willsboro Bay.

Willsboro Bay to the Four Brothers Islands:

Four Brothers Islands on Lake Champlain with Vermont in background.

This segment of the Lake Champlain Blueway Trail begins in the picturesque Willsboro Bay and takes paddlers around Willsboro Point, out to the Four Brothers Islands with unparalleled bird watching opportunities, ending near the mouth of the beautiful Boquet River.

Boquet River:

A paddle up this river is a trip through history, ending at the hamlet of Willsboro, where shopping, dining, and other recreational opportunities are plentiful.

 

Westport (Split Rock) to Essex:

Split Rock

Explore the section of the lake known as “The Narrows,” named for the obvious reason that this is the narrowest part of the lake, rich in history and natural beauty. Paddlers can pick through the many harbors and points along this shoreline, including the unique “Palisades of Lake Champlain,” a geological masterpiece of sheer cliffs ornamented with waterfalls and wildlife.

This segment ends in the hamlet of Essex, with shopping, dining, and parks to enjoy. It is recommended that this segment be completed south to north.

Port Henry to Westport:

Cole Island

Cole Island

This route begins in the Village of Port Henry and passes a number of iron-history sites along the shoreline, including a once-industrious brook and Cole Island believed to be where Father Isaac Jogues, a famous Jesuit missionary was tortured while held captive by the Mohawks.

The route ends in the town of Westport, where paddlers have access to shopping, dining, parks, and a beach and swimming area. It is recommended that this segment be completed south to north.

Crown Point and Port Henry:

Five Museum Tour

Crown Point Barracks

Paddlers can put in at Crown Point State Historic Site, the location of two separate forts under different sovereigns. Nearby are campgrounds, a historic lighthouse and pier, boat launch, and museum.  The route continues along Bulwagga Bay, and then onward to the village of Port Henry with shopping and dining, parks, beaches, campgrounds, and a museum that showcases the town’s mining and iron ore heritage.

Crown Point to Monitor Bay:

This short segment consists of marshes, resulting in a vibrant and diverse habitat of plants and animals. Paddlers can explore Putts Creek Wildlife Management Area before reaching the Town of Crown Point’s Monitor Bay Park and Marina. It is a short walk from here to a bank, stores, and restaurants.

 

Monitor Bay to Ticonderoga:

Explore a narrow and marshy shoreline of the lake that is almost river-like. Wildlife is abundant here, especially birds and waterfowl.

 

Ticonderoga and La Chute River:

Fort Ticonderoga

Fort Ticonderoga

Paddlers get a terrific view of Fort Ticonderoga and its impressive grounds on this segment. The strategic importance of this fort was its location at the mouth of La Chute River, which is the waterway that connects Lake Champlain to Lake George. From Fort Ticonderoga, it is smooth water to downtown Ticonderoga.

Ticonderoga to Chubbs Dock:

Paddlers will start near Fort Ticonderoga, passing through the narrowest point in the lake. The southern part of Lake Champlain has been referred to as the “drowned lands” because it is surround by wetlands, rich with wildlife.

 

Whitehall to South Bay (Chubbs Dock):

South Bay

Lake Champlain’s South Bay

This segment begins in historic Whitehall, the birthplace of the American Navy, and brings paddlers through the waters that became a murky grave for a number of Revolutionary War ships.

The trail also explores South Bay, which offers paddlers ample wildlife viewing opportunities. It is recommended that this segment be completed south to north.

Expanding on one of these day trips, Lakes to Locks has also produced a detailed audio and web tour of Valcour and Crab Islands, which includes paddling information as well as in-depth history and a guided walking tour of Valcour.

The Valcour and Crab Island PassagePort is a mobile-enhanced tour that draws from the expertise of historians, experienced paddlers, and others.

Lake Champlain Archaeological Site Boat Tour

Lake Champlain Archaeological Site Boat Tour

Lake Champlain Archaeological Site Boat Tour

 

Fort Ticonderoga’s 60-foot Carillon is offering boat tours with views of the lake, surrounding mountains and the Fort Ti itself, while crossing some of the most archaeologically rich waters in North America.

The 90-minute archaeological tour, available daily Tuesday through Sunday, features the story of Fort Ticonderoga and places the fort into a larger context as part of the imperial struggle for the continent in the 18th century.

 

Lake Champlain Archaeological Site Boat Tour past Fort Ticonderoga

 

“From shipwrecks to a massive bridge that the Americans built in 1776, Lake Champlain holds defining stories of America’s past,” said Beth Hill, Fort Ticonderoga President and CEO.

 

 

Boat tours aboard the Carillon will run through October. The 60-foot, 35-passenger boat is available for daily tours, field trips, sunset cruises, and charters. Boat tours are available rain or shine.

Lake Champlain Archaeological Site Boat Tour

 

Tickets for the boat cruise are available at Fort Ticonderoga or in advance by calling 518-585-2821.

For more information, and a full list of ongoing programs, visit their website at www.FortTiconderoga.org.

Fort Ticonderoga is located at 102 Fort Ti Road, Ticonderoga.


Melosira: Educational Boat Trips Teach Public About Lake Champlain

Melosira: Educational Boat Trips Teach Public About Lake Champlain

University of Vermont (UVM) Extension, Lake Champlain Sea Grant and ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain will host three Summer on the Lake educational boat cruises in July and August.

Melosira: Educational Boat Trips Teach Public About Lake Champlain

UVM’s R.V. Melosira launching a remotely operated vehicle

The public is invited aboard the UVM research and education vessel, the R/V Melosira, to learn about Lake Champlain and its watershed’s geologic, cultural and historical aspects. Trips will focus on one of two themes, Stories of Lake Champlain (July 17, 9:30-11:30 a.m.) or Life Underwater (Aug. 17, 9:30-11:30 a.m. and Aug. 23, 5:30-7:30 p.m.).

Trips depart from the south side of the Rubenstein Lab/Echo Building at 3 College St. in Burlington. The cost is $25 per person. Participants must be at the boat 15 minutes prior to departure time. The minimum age to participate is eight-years-old. For more information and to register, visit www.uvm.edu/seagrant/events.

Both trips will begin with an interactive introduction to the geology of Lake Champlain and its watershed. From there, the two themes diverge.

Stories of Lake Champlain

Stories of Lake Champlain will provide a cultural and historical view of Vermont’s largest lake. Chief Don Stevens of the Nulhegan Abenaki tribe will share the history of native tribes in the area and their relationship with water. Later in the trip, participants will learn about the lake’s naval history following European settlement.

Rock Dunder

Stops and sights will include Red Rocks Park, Lone Rock Point, Rock Dunder (of historic significance to the Abenakis) and the Horse Ferry shipwreck. The trip will conclude with an optional hands-on sediment assessment session to look for signs of historical land uses and practices on the lake.

 

Participants on the Life Underwater

Participants on the Life Underwater trips will try their hand at being limnologists, scientists who study lakes. They will collect biological, chemical and physical measurements to assess the lake’s health and current conditions by towing for and identifying plankton, sampling sediment and monitoring water clarity, among other activities.

To request a disability-related accommodation to participate in any of these programs, please contact Kris Stepenuck at (802) 656-8504 or kris.stepenuck@uvm.edu no later than three weeks prior to the trip.

Ghosts and Legends of Lake Champlain
Lake Champlain is located between New York’s majestic Adirondacks and Vermont’s famed Green Mountains. Yet despite the beauty of this region, it has been the site of dark and mysterious events; it is not surprising that some spirits linger in this otherwise tranquil place. Fort Ticonderoga saw some of early America’s bloodiest battles, and American, French and British ghosts still stand guard.
Champlain’s islands–Stave, Crab, Valcour and Garden–all host otherworldly inhabitants, and unidentified creatures and objects have made appearances on the water, in the sky and in the forests surrounding the lake.
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Vermont Free Fishing Day 2017

Grand Isle Family Fishing Festival

Vermont Free Fishing Day 2017

Give fishing a try during Vermont’s Free Fishing Day 2017 at the Grand Isle Family Fishing Festival!

Saturday, June 10, 2017
9:00am to 3:00pm
Ed Weed Fish Culture Station,
14 Bell Hill Rd, Grand Isle, VT

Give fishing a try during Vermont’s Free Fishing Day 2017 at the Grand Isle Family Fishing Festival!

Vermont Free Fishing Day 2017 lets both resident and nonresident anglers fish in Vermont for the day without a license.

The Grand Isle Family Fishing Festival is designed for young anglers and families offering basic fishing instruction and the chance for kids to catch big trout in the hatchery pond. The festival is free, open to the public and no fishing experience or equipment is needed.

Saturday, June 10, 2017
9:00am to 3:00pm
Ed Weed Fish Culture Station,
14 Bell Hill Rd, Grand Isle, VT

The event features a series of fishing skills learning stations, including knot-tying, fish identification, line casting, hook setting, fish cleaning, and more. After kids and families complete several stations they will be issued a loaner fishing rod and bait and given a chance to practice their skills by fishing the hatchery pond, stocked with some very impressive trout.

For more information contact the Ed Weed Fish Culture Station at 802-372-3171


Other Lake Champlain Fishing Articles:

Kids Fishing Events Scheduled For May & June In Vermont

Over Three Dozen Kids Fishing Events Scheduled For May & June In Vermont

Over Three Dozen Kids Fishing Events Scheduled For May & June In Vermont

 

Over three dozen children’s fishing events are scheduled for May and June throughout Vermont, offering the opportunity for kids and families to enjoy the sport of fishing as well as the state’s natural resources.

“Fishing is a wonderful way for families and friends to take in Vermont’s great outdoors and spend time with each other,” said Ali Thomas, education manager with Vermont Fish & Wildlife. “Between several educational programs run by Vermont Fish & Wildlife, and an assortment of kids fishing derbies and clinics hosted by local organizations across the state, there is tons of fishing fun to be had in the coming weeks.”

One of the more popular programs is “Let’s Go Fishing” (LGF), which uses trained volunteer instructors to teach and encourage young people and their families about fishing. The instructors teach basic fishing skills, how to use different types of tackle, the importance of good aquatic habitat, fishing ethics and fishing regulations.

Free LGF clinics are found throughout the state during any time of the year. For a complete list of LGF clinics, visit the “Fishing Events and Programs” page at www.vtfishandwildlife.com.

Over Three Dozen Kids Fishing Events Scheduled For May & June In Vermont

Reel Fun Vermont

Vermont Fish & Wildlife also has a “Children’s Fishing Program” providing kids with the opportunity for a fun and successful fishing experience at locally organized events. Organizers of these events often include charitable, community, or non-profit groups such as fire departments, fish and game clubs, Rotary and Lions clubs, town recreation committees, 4-H clubs, and scouts groups, among others. The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department provides eight-to-ten-inch stocked trout for the program.

A complete list of the children’s fishing events is updated periodically onthe “Fishing Events and Programs” page at www.vtfishandwildlife.com.

Additionally, for the third consecutive year, Vermont Fish & Wildlife and the Vermont Department of Forests, Parks & Recreation are teaming up to enhance fishing opportunities and experiences at Vermont State Parks through the “Reel Fun” initiative. The program provides free fishing rods and tackle to state park visitors for loan to use at 18 different Vermont State Parks.

To buy a fishing license or learn more about fishing in Vermont, visit www.vtfishandwildlife.com.

 


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