Category Archives: Historic Sites

Historic sites and locations on Lake Champlain

The Battle of Carillon, or the 1758 Battle of Ticonderoga

The Battle of Carillon, or the 1758 Battle of Ticonderoga

July 8, 1758

 

Fort Ticonderoga or Carillon

Fort Ticonderoga or Carillon

The Battle of Carillon, also known as the 1758 Battle of Ticonderoga, was fought July 8, 1758, during the French and Indian War (which was part of the global Seven Years’ War). It was fought near Fort Carillon (now known as Fort Ticonderoga) on the shore of Lake Champlain in the frontier area between the British colony of New York and the French colony of New France.

The British and their colonists in New England had long been troubled by French and their native allies attacking the ever-expanding frontier settlements. Many of these attacks generated from the French stronghold of Fort St. Frederic (now Crown Point) on the western shore of Lake Champlain. That fort secured French control of the lake.

In 1755 the French began construction of Fort Carillon to protect the portage along the LaChute River between Lakes George and Champlain. It was from Fort Carillon that the French , under General Montcalm, staged their successful attack and siege of Fort William Henry in 1757. The fall of William Henry, and the later massacre of its surrendered defenders and civilians, left both lakes in the hands of the French.

 

A Massive British Army Attacks

British troops preparing to sail north before the Battle of Carillon

British troops preparing to sail north before the Battle of Carillon

On July 5, 1758 a massive British army sailed north down Lake George to attack Carillon and Fort St. Frederic.The force consisted of 6,000 British regulars and 12,000 provincial troops, including militia, rangers and native allies. It is said that the fleet transporting the army was three columns wide and three miles long as they rowed up Lake George.

The army made landfall at the north end of Lake George on July 6 with minimal casualties, except for the loss of General Howe, who was beloved by his troops and probably the best field commander in the British army.

 

The Battle of Carillon

Troops of The Black Watch storming the breastworks at the Battle of Carillon

Troops of The Black Watch storming the breastworks at the Battle of Carillon

The battle mostly took place on a rise about 3/4 mile from the fort. The French army of about 3,600 men under General Louis-Joseph de Montcalm and the Chevalier de Levis decisively defeated the overwhelmingly numerically superior force of 18,000 British troops under General James Abercrombie.

The British frontal assault of an entrenched French position without using field artillery left the British and their allies vulnerable and allowed the French to win a decisive victory. It was the bloodiest battle in the American theater of this war, with about 400 French and more than 2,500 British casualties.

Many military historians have cited the Battle of Carillon as a classic example of tactical military incompetence. Abercrombie, confident of a quick victory, ignored several military options, such as: flanking the French breastworks, waiting for his artillery, or laying siege to the fort. Instead, he decided instead on a direct frontal assault of the entrenched French position without the benefit of artillery.

 

 

The Importance of the Battle of Carillon

French troops cheering General Montcalm after the Battle of Carillon

French troops cheering General Montcalm after the Battle of Carillon

British forces, expecting an easy victory, thought the capture of Carillon would lead in turn to the capture of the more strategic and important Fort St. Frederic (Fort Crown Point), and ultimately mastery of Lake Champlain. The staggering defeat forced them to retreat back up Lake George to the ruins of Fort William Henry and ultimately to Fort Edward.

The battle ended the military career of General Abercromby, and bolstered the status of General Montcalm, who was to die next year on the Plains of Abraham, defending Quebec from British assault.

The fort was abandoned by the French the following year, and it has since been known as Fort Ticonderoga (after its location). This battle gave the fort a reputation for impregnability that had an effect on future military operations in the area. Despite several large-scale military movements through the area, in both the French and Indian War and the American Revolutionary War, this was the only major battle fought near the fort’s location.

 


Lake Champlain Archaeological Site Boat Tour

Lake Champlain Archaeological Site Boat Tour

Lake Champlain Archaeological Site Boat Tour

 

Fort Ticonderoga’s 60-foot Carillon is offering boat tours with views of the lake, surrounding mountains and the Fort Ti itself, while crossing some of the most archaeologically rich waters in North America.

The 90-minute archaeological tour, available daily Tuesday through Sunday, features the story of Fort Ticonderoga and places the fort into a larger context as part of the imperial struggle for the continent in the 18th century.

 

Lake Champlain Archaeological Site Boat Tour past Fort Ticonderoga

 

“From shipwrecks to a massive bridge that the Americans built in 1776, Lake Champlain holds defining stories of America’s past,” said Beth Hill, Fort Ticonderoga President and CEO.

 

 

Boat tours aboard the Carillon will run through October. The 60-foot, 35-passenger boat is available for daily tours, field trips, sunset cruises, and charters. Boat tours are available rain or shine.

Lake Champlain Archaeological Site Boat Tour

 

Tickets for the boat cruise are available at Fort Ticonderoga or in advance by calling 518-585-2821.

For more information, and a full list of ongoing programs, visit their website at www.FortTiconderoga.org.

Fort Ticonderoga is located at 102 Fort Ti Road, Ticonderoga.


Vermont’s Champlain Region State Historic Sites Open May 27th

Vermont’s Champlain Region State Historic Sites Open May 27th

Vermont’s Champlain Region State Historic Sites

Lake Champlain Bridge, Chimney Point, Addison, Vermont

The State Historic Sites in Vermont’s Champlain Region open to the public on Saturday, May 27, 2017 at 9:30 am.

The Champlain Region State Historic Sites are Chimney Point, Mount Independence, and the Hubbardton Battlefield.

 

Chimney Point

Champlain Region State Historic Sites- Chimney Point

Chimney Point Roadside Sign
Click Image to Enlarge

 

Located on Lake Champlain in Addison, Chimney Point is one of the most strategic locations on the lake. It is one side of a natural bottleneck of the lake. In 2017 there are two new exhibits that feature artifacts from the Lake Champlain Bridge archaeology work. The exhibits showcase evidence of nearly 9,000 years of human habitation here.

Champlain Region State Historic Sites, Chimney Point Center

Chimney Point Visitor Center

The grounds include a short trail with interpretive signs and a historic pier from the old 1929 Lake Champlain Bridge and a walk across the new bridge. Visitors can try the new bridge area map quest — forms are available at Chimney Point in Vermont or at the New York Visitor Center on the New York side of the bridge.

The site is open Wednesdays through Sundays and Monday holidays, 9:30 am to 5 pm. Admission is $5.00 for adults and free for children under 15. For more information call (802) 759-2412.

Mount Independence

Mount Independence

Mural of Mount Independence Showing
Bridge Across Lake Champlain to Fort Ticonderoga

Click Image to Enlarge

Mount Independence in Orwell is a National Historic Landmark, named after the Declaration of Independence in 1776. The hill, formerly called Rattlesnake Hill, at the time of construction was manned by about 12,000 American troops – making it the most heavily manned fortification in North America at its time.

This year is the 240th anniversary of American, British, and German occupation, and a new book on its Revolutionary history is coming out in July. This year’s highlight event is ‘Soldiers Atop the Mount’ living history weekend, August 26 and 27, with a 5K walk on the 26th.

Champlain Region State Historic Sites - Mount Independence

Mount Independence Visitor Center

The museum also offers six miles of trails to walk. Open daily, 9:30 am to 5 pm.

Admission is $5.00 for adults and free for children under 15. For more information call (802) 948-2000.

Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site

Champlain Region State Historic Sites Hubbardton Battlefield

Hubbardton Battlefield Roadside Sign
Click Image to Enlarge

Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site is the site of the only Revolutionary War battle fought in what would become Vermont. It is one of the best-preserved battlefields in America, retaining most of its original setting. Here on July 7, 1777 Colonel Seth Warner’s New England troops fought a rearguard action against British forces that were pursuing the American army retreating from Fort Ticonderoga. The American victory at Hubbardton saved those troops for use in later Patriot victories at Bennington and Saratoga.

 

 

Hubbardton Battlefield reenactmentThis year is the 240th anniversary of the July 7, 1777 battle, and it will be celebrated with a battle weekend on July 8 and 9. Up to 400 re-enactors are expected.

Open Thursdays through Sundays and Monday holidays, 9:30 am to 5 pm. Admission is $3.00 for adults and free for children under 15. For more information call (802) 273-2282.

 

The last day of the season is Sunday, October 15. Other Vermont State-owned Historic Sites opening on May 27 are the President Calvin Coolidge State Historic Site in Plymouth, Justin Smith Morrill Homestead in Strafford, and Old Constitution House in Windsor.

For more information, click here.


Guns Over The Champlain Valley:
A Guide To Historic Military Sites And Battlefields
(Paperback)
Author: Coffin, Howard

The Champlain Valley is one of the most historically rich regions of the country. Fort Ticonderoga, Saratoga, Fort William Henry, Crown Point, Plattsburgh, Bennington and Valcour Island all lie along the ancient warpath that is the Champlain Corridor.
In this lively and informative new travel guide to historic places and events, the author leads you to each venue, describing the events and their long-lasting impact.  Adventure awaits you with Guns over the Champlain Valley.
Order Today

 

More About Lake Champlain History:

Five Museums Tour

Five Museums Tour

Five Museums Tour

Crown Point Barracks

This special tour reveals the long history of the area around the Lake Champlain Bridge on Saturday, September 17, 2016.

You’ll visit Chimney Point State Historic Site, John Strong DAR Museum, Crown Point State Historic Site, Penfield Museum, and Port Henry Iron Center.

Tour begins at 10:00 at Chimney Point. Pre-registration recommended. Call for details and fee. Vermont Archaeology Month Program

Contact: 802-759-2412

Event Date:

Saturday, September 17, 2016

10:00 am to 3:00 pm

Ethan Allen: His Life and Times
is the story of one of Vermont’s
most famous citizens.Written by
Willard Sterne Randall this book
sheds a new light on one of
Vermont’s founding fathers.
Buy Ethan Allen: 
His Life and Times
Here

 

More About Lake Champlain Historic Sites:

Crown Point / Chimney Point Historic Region

Crown Point / Chimney Point Historic Region by James P. Millard

Crown Point / Chimney Point Historic Region

Crown Point / Chimney Point Historic Region

Information about the historic Crown Point/Chimney Point region of Vermont and New York State on Lake Champlain

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.historiclakes.org

The Crown Point/Chimney Point peninsulas on Lake Champlain are some of the most historic places in the area. Long recognized as places of strategic importance on this waterway through the wilderness, each side of the lake was inhabited and fortified from earliest times. Chimney Point was the site of Fort de Pieux, a simple wooden stockade built by the French; and is now the site of a historic brick tavern owned by the State of Vermont and operated as Chimney Point Historic Site.

Opposite Chimney Point, across the great steel bridge, is Crown Point. This historic location was the site of an important French fort, St. Frederic; and an enormous British Fortress, known simply as ‘His Majesty’s Fort at Crown Point’. It was not known as Fort Crown Point, nor was it called Fort Amherst, as some early sources claim. The Crown Point peninsula played a critical role in the French and Indian War and the American Revolution. The ruins there are maintained by the New York State Department of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. The park is known as Crown Point State Historic Site. The park includes the ruins of both fortresses, a number of important redoubts, and the beautiful Champlain Memorial Lighthouse on the site of the earlier Grenadier’s Redoubt.

Any visit to the historic lakes should include a trip to this remarkably historic and beautiful site.

See on Scoop.itLake Champlain Life

Ethan Allen: His Life and Times
is the story of one of Vermont’s
most famous citizens.Written by
Willard Sterne Randall this book
sheds a new light on one of
Vermont’s founding fathers.
Buy Ethan Allen: 
His Life and Times
Here

 

More About Lake Champlain Historic Sites: