Category Archives: History

The History And Mystery Of Split Rock Mountain

Split Rock Mountain, the locale of an ancient boundary between nations, is the exotic and mysterious Far East of the Adirondacks.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.adirondackalmanack.com

Split Rock Mountain has more than eleven miles of marked trails. They are laid out in a rough figure-eight, with the main access near the center. Most of the trails follow old roads; one allows snowmobiles, which are infrequent.

See on Scoop.itLake Champlain Life

Whiskey on the Lake – Smuggling on Lake Champlain

Whiskey on the Lake

Lake Champlain has a long history of being a major smuggling route between the U.S. and Canada. From the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812 through Prohibition and beyond smugglers have used this natural water highway to try to avoid government taxes, tariffs and embargoes.

Whiskey on the Lake video presentation

U.S Revenue Cutter, Pickering

 

Smugglers moved contraband both north and south to markets hungry for products that were in short supply, banned or too expensive. Early smuggling operations after the wars included the infamous Black Snake Affair in which two people were killed and resulted in the execution of one of the smugglers.

 

This video presentation of ‘Whiskey on the Lake’ from the Milton, VT Historical Society deals with more recent events as Dr. Scott McLaughlin tells how Lake Champlain was important thoroughfare for smugglers during the Prohibition era.

 

 

Lake Champlain

This 128-page softcover book features stunning historical images from the archives of Lake Champlain Maritime Museum and other regional collections, and includes chapters on Patriotic Sites and Celebrations; Commerce in the Canal Era; The Age of Steam; Crossing Lake Champlain; Recreational Boating; Summer and Summer Folk; Hunting and Fishing; and Winter. ‘Lake Champlain’ tells the story of this historic, busy commercial corridor and recreational destination.

Buy Here

More About Lake Champlain History:

 

Crown Point / Chimney Point Historic Region

Crown Point / Chimney Point Historic Region by James P. Millard

Crown Point / Chimney Point Historic Region

Crown Point / Chimney Point Historic Region

Information about the historic Crown Point/Chimney Point region of Vermont and New York State on Lake Champlain

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.historiclakes.org

The Crown Point/Chimney Point peninsulas on Lake Champlain are some of the most historic places in the area. Long recognized as places of strategic importance on this waterway through the wilderness, each side of the lake was inhabited and fortified from earliest times. Chimney Point was the site of Fort de Pieux, a simple wooden stockade built by the French; and is now the site of a historic brick tavern owned by the State of Vermont and operated as Chimney Point Historic Site.

Opposite Chimney Point, across the great steel bridge, is Crown Point. This historic location was the site of an important French fort, St. Frederic; and an enormous British Fortress, known simply as ‘His Majesty’s Fort at Crown Point’. It was not known as Fort Crown Point, nor was it called Fort Amherst, as some early sources claim. The Crown Point peninsula played a critical role in the French and Indian War and the American Revolution. The ruins there are maintained by the New York State Department of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. The park is known as Crown Point State Historic Site. The park includes the ruins of both fortresses, a number of important redoubts, and the beautiful Champlain Memorial Lighthouse on the site of the earlier Grenadier’s Redoubt.

Any visit to the historic lakes should include a trip to this remarkably historic and beautiful site.

See on Scoop.itLake Champlain Life


Guns Over The Champlain Valley:
A Guide To Historic Military Sites And Battlefields
(Paperback)
Author: Coffin, Howard

The Champlain Valley is one of the most historically rich regions of the country. Fort Ticonderoga, Saratoga, Fort William Henry, Crown Point, Plattsburgh, Bennington and Valcour Island all lie along the ancient warpath that is the Champlain Corridor.
In this lively and informative new travel guide to historic places and events, the author leads you to each venue, describing the events and their long-lasting impact.  Adventure awaits you with Guns over the Champlain Valley.
Order Today

 

More About Lake Champlain Historic Sites:

Rare French and Indian War Era Musket Donated to Fort Ticonderoga

(Ticonderoga, NY)  Through the keen eye of a museum supporter and generosity of an important donor, a rare British musket that may have seen use at Fort Ticonderoga has recently joined the museum’s collection enabling Fort Ticonderoga to more completely interpret the site’s remarkable history.

Wilson-Musket donated to Fort Ticonderoga

Wilson-Musket

Fort Ticonderoga’s Curator of Collections, Christopher Fox said “The donation of this Wilson musket fills an important and long-standing gap in the collection.  It is a type we know was used by troops who served at the Fort.  It is also an important reminder of the struggles armies sometimes faced in arming their troops in wartime and the great diversity of arms that found their way into military service as a result.”

The Wilson musket will be placed on exhibit this season in the museum’s highly acclaimed exhibit Bullets & Blades: The Weapons of America’s Colonial Wars and Revolution. The exhibit, featuring over 150 weapons, tells the story of the use of military and civilian weapons in America during the 17th and 18th centuries. Fort Ticonderoga’s collection of 18th-century military objects is celebrated as one of the best of its type in the world.

During the French & Indian War, the London gun maker Richard Wilson produced muskets to arm the militias of several American colonies including New York, New Jersey, probably Massachusetts.  Though they bear similarities to muskets produced for the British army, the weapons produced by Richard Wilson are not “army” muskets, they are “commercial” or “contract” muskets.”  Their brass parts, stocks, and barrels resemble British army guns, but are simpler and lighter overall.  Of the estimated 4,000 contract weapons that may have been produced by Wilson, only a handful has survived through today.

The potential connection with Fort Ticonderoga’s history stretches back to the British army’s planned invasion of Canada and the disastrous attack on the French lines on July 8, 1758.  As British General James Abercromby was preparing his 17,000-man army, he had considerable difficulty obtaining enough weapons to arm his troops.  Among the weapons he was eventually able to acquire were 1,000 muskets owned by the City of New York.  These weapons had originally been purchased by the city from Richard Wilson in 1755.  While it is not known with absolute certainty, it is thought that at least some of those weapons were issued to New York Provincial troops.  Many of those troops took part in the battle before the French lines on July 8.  It is known, however, that many of Wilson’s muskets were used at Ticonderoga as numerous brass pieces of these guns have been recovered on the site during various periods of reconstruction.

About FORT TICONDEROGA:  America’s Fort ™

Located on Lake Champlain in the beautiful 6 million acre Adirondack Park, Fort Ticonderoga is a not-for-profit historic site and museum that ensures that present and future generations learn from the struggles, sacrifices, and victories that shaped the nations of North America and changed world history. Serving the public since 1909, Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 70,000 visitors annually and is dedicated to the preservation and interpretation of Fort Ticonderoga’s history.  Accredited by the American Association of Museums, Fort Ticonderoga offers programs, historic interpretation, tours, demonstrations, and exhibits throughout the year and is open for daily visitation May 17 through October 20, 2013. The 2013 season features the Fort’s newest exhibit “It would make a heart of stone melt” Sickness, Injury, and Medicine at Fort Ticonderoga which explores early medical theory, practice, and experience as each relates to the armies that served at Fort Ticonderoga in the 18th century.  Visit www.FortTiconderoga.org for a full list of ongoing programs or call 518-585-2821. Fort Ticonderoga is located at 100 Fort Ti Road, Ticonderoga, New York.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Photo:  Wilson Musket, Fort Ticonderoga Museum Collection.

Evacuation Day 1776: Fort Ticonderoga

Fort Fever Series Program at Fort Ticonderoga: March 17th

Fort Ticonderoga’s Fort Fever Series continues on Sunday, March 17, at 2 pm with “Evacuation Day 1776” presented by Director of Education Rich Strum. The cost is $10 per person and will be collected at the door; free for members of the Friends of Fort Ticonderoga.

Evacuation Day 1776: Fort Ticonderoga

Fort Ticonderoga boasts one of North America’s largest 18th century artillery collections including 2 cannons from Fort Ticonderoga that were hauled by Henry Knox to Boston in the winter of 1776

While March 17 is widely celebrated as St. Patrick’s Day, it is officially known as “Evacuation Day” in Boston. On March 17, 1776, the British evacuated Boston after a months-long siege by the Continental Army under the command of General George Washington. Evacuation Day commemorates that pivotal turning point in the early years of the Revolution.

“The presentation traces the growing confrontation between colonists and the British government through the 1760s and early 1770s, including the Stamp Act Crisis, the Boston “Massacre,” and the Boston Tea Party,” said Rich Strum, Director of Education. “Even before fighting erupted in Lexington and Concord in 1775, Boston was in essence an occupied city, with British troops patrolling the streets.”

Shortly after the skirmishes at Lexington and Concord, the rebels under General Artemas Ward and then General George Washington surrounded the city of Boston, bottling up the British on the Boston peninsula. The siege was not broken until Washington had artillery placed on Dorchester heights—artillery that had come from Ticonderoga through the herculean efforts of Henry Knox earlier in the winter. Finally, on March 17, 1776, the Royal Navy evacuated British troops and loyal subjects. Boston was in Patriot hands.

This program takes place in the Deborah Clarke Mars Education Center. The doors open at 1:30 pm, with the program commencing at 2 pm and lasting approximately an hour.

A final program in the Fort Fever Series, entitled “Very Well Prepared for the British Army,” is scheduled for April 21 and includes a site walk with Fort Ticonderoga’s Director of Interpretation, Stuart Lilie. Visit www.fortticonderoga.org and select the “Explore and Learn” tab to learn more.

FORT TICONDEROGA America’s Fort ™

Located on Lake Champlain in the beautiful 6 million acre Adirondack Park, Fort Ticonderoga is a not-for-profit historic site and museum that ensures that present and future generations learn from the struggles, sacrifices, and victories that shaped the nations of North America and changed world history. Serving the public since 1909, Fort Ticonderoga engages more than 70,000 visitors annually and is dedicated to the preservation and interpretation of Fort Ticonderoga’s history. Accredited by the American Association of Museums, Fort Ticonderoga offers programs, historic interpretation, tours, demonstrations, and exhibits throughout the year and is open for daily visitation May 17 through October 20, 2013. The 2013 season features the Fort’s newest exhibit “It would make a heart of stone melt” Sickness, Injury, and Medicine at Fort Ticonderoga which explores early medical theory, practice, and experience as each relates to the armies that served at Fort Ticonderoga in the 18th century. Visit www.FortTiconderoga.org for a full list of ongoing programs or call 518-585-2821. Fort Ticonderoga is located at 100 Fort Ti Road, Ticonderoga, New York.

America’s Fort is a registered trademark of the Fort Ticonderoga Association.

Amanda Medina
Communication Specialist
Work 518.472.0060
BrawnMediaNY.com / WSIBrawnMedia.com