Category Archives: News

News and events around the Lake Champlain Valley of northern New York and Vermont and southern Quebec

Lakes Appreciation Month

July 2015 is Lakes Appreciation Month

Vermont’s Governor Peter Shumlin signed a proclamation declaring July Lakes Appreciation Month. The proclamation states that lakes and reservoirs are “critical to Vermont’s environment and quality of life, providing sources of recreation, scenic beauty, and habitat for wildlife” and that ”maintaining the health of our lakes, ponds, and reservoirs is the responsibility of every citizen.”

Lakes Appreciation Month?

Vermont’s lakes are public waterways.

“… by signing this proclamation, I seek to recognize the tremendous and critical efforts of the many Vermont citizens, community leaders, volunteers, lake and watershed organizations to protect and restore the quality of our state’s many lakes and ponds.” ~  Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin

About Lakes Appreciation Month

Lakes Appreciation Month is a time to think about where you would be without water. It is also a time to think about the threats facing your lakes and reservoirs. Lakes Appreciation Month is an initiative started by the North American Lakes Management Society (NALMS). NALMS mission is to “forge partnerships among citizens, scientists, and professionals to foster the management and protection of lakes and reservoirs for today and tomorrow”.

Growing population, development, and invasive plants and animals put stress on these waterbodies. All life relies water. And as you know, we can no longer afford to take for granted that these water resources will always be there and always be usable.

 

Lake Appreciation Month in Vermont

Vermont has been a leader in the protection of water resources. Recently, 2014’s Shoreland Protection Act  and 2015’s landmark Vermont Clean Water Act, that addressed polluted stormwater runoff, continue that tradition of leadership. The three departments of the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources: Fish & Wildlife, Forest Parks & Recreation, and Environmental Conservation all work to protect Vermonters’ ability to enjoy the state’s many lakes, reservoirs and ponds through education, outreach, oversight and maintaining access through boat launch areas and State Parks. Vermont’s citizens are instrumental in supporting the Agency through monitoring water quality, preventing the spread of invasive species, and educating the public about the importance of caring for the state’s waters.

Articles About Lake Champlain and Blue Green  Algae:

 

State Of The Lake Report Details Challenges, Progress

State Of The Lake Report Details Challenges, Progress

A new report from the Lake Champlain Basin Program provides a comprehensive update on an array of indicators of the health of the lake. It shows serious

Sourced through Scoop.it from: digital.vpr.net

Bill Howland, the director of the Lake Champlain Basin Program, cautioned while presenting the report that things aren’t all going in the right direction. The “main lake,” central part of Lake Champlain that makes up 65 percent of the lake’s overall volume, isn’t getting better.

See on Scoop.itLake Champlain Life

The 2015 State of the Lake Summary

2015 State of the Lake Summary

2015 State of the Lake summary

2015 State of the Lake summary

Lake Champlain Basin program released the 2015 State of the Lake. Summary and key points of the report include:

Over 85% of Lake Champlain’s water is consistently of excellent quality, with another 13% of usually good quality.

In the remaining 2% of the Lake – most notably in Missisquoi and Saint Albans Bays – the conditions are seasonally alarming, with excess nutrients triggering blue green algae blooms.

 

 

More Articles About Lake Champlain and Blue Green  Algae:

The state of Lake Champlain, in 3 sentences, from the Lake Champlain Basin Program. pic.twitter.com/y37DaX0Q8j

Sourced through Scoop.it from: twitter.com

See on Scoop.itLake Champlain Life

Lake Champlain phosphorus concentration 1990-2014

Lake Champlain phosphorus concentration by lake segment

Lake Champlain phosphorus concentration 1990-2014

Lake Champlain phosphorus concentration 1990-2014

Lake Champlain Basin program released the 2015 “State of the Lake” report. This infographic shows Lake Champlain phosphorus concentration broken out by lake segment or section over the 1990 to 2014 time period.

Phosphorus concentration is directly related to the increase of toxic blue green algae blooms in Lake Champlain and other waters.

More Articles About Lake Champlain and Blue Green  Algae:

 

Lake Champlain Basin program unveiling 2015 “State of the Lake” report. Lots of info on phosphorus loading. pic.twitter.com/MlsxlkslgN

Sourced through Scoop.it from: twitter.com

See on Scoop.itLake Champlain Life

Scientists Claim Nitrogen as Bad as Phosphorus for Algae Blooms in Lake

Researchers Say Levels of Nitrogen as Bad as Phosphorus for Algae Blooms

Scientists Claim Nitrogen as Bad as Phosphorus for Algae Blooms in Lake

Blue green algae bloom

The common wisdom held that algae blooms could only be caused by high concentrations of phosphorus in freshwater lakes, but new research show increased levels of nitrogen as bad as phosphorus for algae blooms formation in lakes.

At its 2015 conference last May in Burlington, Vermont, the International Association for Great Lakes Research held a session on that topic. chaired by Dan Peckham coordinator of the Harmful Algal Blooms Workgroup of the New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission.

Blue-green algae contains cyanobacteria, which produce the cyanotoxins that make seasonal blooms harmful, while green algae are harmless, according to Peckham. Blue-green algae is the source of the seasonal toxic blooms on portions of Lake Champlain.

“Usually the concentration of cyanotoxins is associated with biodegradable dissolved phosphorus, but some people have been hypothesizing more recently that high levels of nitrogen may also be responsible,” ~ Dan Peckham, New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission

 

Runoff from Farm fields

Unprotected farm fields yield topsoil as well as
farm fertilizers and other potential pollutants when heavy rains occur.

Both nitrogen and phosphorus are needed to grow any kind of plant, including algae.

Nitrogen and phosphorus wash into water bodies and then release into the air. The chemicals come from stormwater, wastewater, fossil fuels, soaps and fertilizers, according to the Environmental Protection Agency website.

 

 

“Excessive amounts of growth are caused by high levels of both nitrogen and phosphorus. Nitrogen is not worse than phosphorus, but both need to be reduced. The bottom line is that nitrogen input needs to be controlled along with what we already know about controlling phosphorus input… If we only reduce phosphorus we may not get there fast enough in terms of getting a lake or even a marine system back to what we would deem desirable.”  ~ Hans Paerl, Professor of marine and environmental sciences,University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

 

Paerl said freshwater researchers have developed tunnel vision by focusing on phosphorus for so long. The same protocols that keep phosphorus out of lakes and streams apply to nitrogen. he added.

 

Scientists Claim Nitrogen as Bad as Phosphorus for Algae Blooms in Lake

Nitrogen as Bad as Phosphorus for Algae Blooms in Lake

 

Nitrogen Levels Could Make Drinking Lake Water Unsafe

Elevated levels of nitrogen in drinking water are also known to cause health problems in young children, according to the Vermont Health Department. Last year algae blooms were responsible for contaminating drinking water supplies for several communities on Lake Erie.
Mike Winslow, a staff scientist at the Lake Champlain Committee, said he has never known of a time where blooms in Lake Champlain have affected the quality of drinking water in Vermont.

 

More Articles About Lake Champlain and Blue Green  Algae: