Category Archives: News

News and events around the Lake Champlain Valley of northern New York and Vermont and southern Quebec

Lampricide treatment scheduled for Westport, Crown Point

Lampricide treatment slated for Westport, Crown Point

Sections of Beaver Brook and Putnam Creek will be treated with lampricide because the treatments were canceled last fall due to flow conditions.

Lampricide treatment scheduled for Westport, Crown Point

Beaver Brook is in Westport, but since its mouth is close to the southern town line with Moriah, “its advisories zone spans less than a quarter mile of the shoreline in the northern corner of the Town of Moriah and about 0.5 miles up the shoreline in the southern corner of the Town of Westport,” accordong to Bradley Young of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Putnam Creek and its advisory areas are all within the Town of Crown Point, he said.
Since  Lake Champlain is so narrow at that point, the corresponding area on the Vermont side is part of the advisory.

Lampricide Treatment is Weather Dependent

The Lake Champlain Fish and Wildlife Management Cooperative will apply the lampricides in Putnam Creek on Tuesday, April 26, and Beaver Brook on Thursday, April 28, if the weather cooperates.

“Treatment dates are always contingent on weather and may change with short notice,” Young said in a press release.

Larval sea lamprey live in rivers and on deltas for about four years before transforming to their parasitic phase and emigrating to Lake Champlain.

The cooperative will apply a select pesticide, TFM (3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol), to the waterways for between 12 and 14 hours “in prescribed and precise concentrations with careful monitoring to ensure effective elimination of sea lamprey larvae and protection of non-target species.”

Lampricide Treatments Have Been Successful

Larval sea lamprey live in rivers and on deltas for about four years before transforming to their parasitic phase and migrating to Lake Champlain.

A 2015  study revealed an average 27 lamprey wounds per 100 lake trout and 19 per 100 Atlantic salmon.

That compares to the record years of 2007 and 2003, when there were 99 wounds for lake trout and 79 for salmon, respectively.

“Several control initiatives are underway that will further reduce the sea lamprey population and reduce their impacts on Lake Champlain’s fish populations,” Young said in the release.

Lake sturgeon and walleye are other species whose populations benefit from the control program.

“Sea lamprey control also generates economic activity by increasing angling opportunities and the time that boaters, anglers and their families spend in the Lake Champlain area,” the release noted.

ADVISORIES

While the advisories for Beaver Brook and Putnam Creek are in effect, the New York State Department of Health says not to use the water for drinking, swimming, fishing, irrigation or livestock watering.

 

For Putnam Creek, the advisory will be in effect 9.2 miles from the application point to the stream mouth and also 1.5 miles northward on Lake Champlain and 1 mile south along the lake.

The advisory for Beaver Brook is 2 miles from the stream mouth to the point of application and a half mile north and south on Lake Champlain.

For more information on local lamprey treatment, including the schedule, progress reports and water-use advisories, call (888) 596-0611.

 

Ghosts and Legends of Lake Champlain
Lake Champlain is located between New York’s majestic Adirondacks and Vermont’s famed Green Mountains. Yet despite the beauty of this region, it has been the site of dark and mysterious events; it is not surprising that some spirits linger in this otherwise tranquil place. Fort Ticonderoga saw some of early America’s bloodiest battles, and American, French and British ghosts still stand guard.
Champlain’s islands–Stave, Crab, Valcour and Garden–all host otherworldly inhabitants, and unidentified creatures and objects have made appearances on the water, in the sky and in the forests surrounding the lake.
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More About Lake Champlain’s Invasive Species:

VT Fish & Wildlife Seeks Historic Photos of Dead Creek Wildlife Management Area

VT Fish & Wildlife Seeks Historic Photos of Dead Creek Wildlife Management Area

VT Fish & Wildlife Seeks Historic Photos of Dead Creek Wildlife Management Area

The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department is asking the public to check their old photo albums for any historic photos of Dead Creek Wildlife Management Area in Addison, Vermont. The department is seeking photos for a display at the new Dead Creek Visitor Center, which will be opened to the public in 2017.

Dead Creek is one of the department’s flagship wildlife management areas. It is popular with bird watchers, hunters, and anglers, receiving thousands of visitors every year. It contains a series of artificial ponds and wetlands that are maintained to encourage use by waterfowl, shorebirds, and a variety of other wildlife species.

“Dead Creek has been popular with Vermonters for over a century as a place to appreciate wildlife,” said Vermont Fish & Wildlife’s Amy Alfieri, who manages Dead Creek. “We’re looking for any historical photos of these lands that will show the changes in management and land use over time. We are especially interested in photos of the area before the dams were built. If anyone has old home movies of people using Dead Creek for hunting, fishing, or birdwatching, that may be useful to us as well for a video we are producing about the history of this area.”

VT Fish & Wildlife Seeks Historic Photos of Dead Creek Wildlife Management Area

People wishing to submit copies of photos or home videos can contact Amy Alfieri at amy.alfieri@vermont.gov to find out how to submit them.

 

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This 128-page softcover book features stunning historical images from the archives of Lake Champlain Maritime Museum and other regional collections, and includes chapters on Patriotic Sites and Celebrations; Commerce in the Canal Era; The Age of Steam; Crossing Lake Champlain; Recreational Boating; Summer and Summer Folk; Hunting and Fishing; and Winter. ‘Lake Champlain’ tells the story of this historic, busy commercial corridor and recreational destination.

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New Exhibit at ECHO Looks at Lake Champlain’s Invasive Species

ECHO Looks at Lake Champlain’s Invasive Species

ECHO Looks at Lake Champlain's Invasive Species

A new exhibit opens at ECHO, Leahy Center for Lake Champlain Thursday focused on invasive species in Lake Champlain.

Dozens of local students will help by performing original plays beginning at 10:30 am on Thursday at the  grand opening of the new exhibit titled ‘Invasives: Lake Champlain’s Most Unwanted‘. More than 150 students from preschool to eighth grade will participate.

The exhibit features information about the pests invading water habitats, as well as ways to help protect the lake’s ecosystems and is supported by funding from the Lake Champlain Basin Program.

Specialists with the ECHO, Leahy Center said non-native plants and animals inhabiting Lake Champlain often overpower the native species. Officials with the ECHO, Leahy Center are working to counter this problem.

 

Ghosts and Legends of Lake Champlain
Lake Champlain is located between New York’s majestic Adirondacks and Vermont’s famed Green Mountains. Yet despite the beauty of this region, it has been the site of dark and mysterious events; it is not surprising that some spirits linger in this otherwise tranquil place. Fort Ticonderoga saw some of early America’s bloodiest battles, and American, French and British ghosts still stand guard.
Champlain’s islands–Stave, Crab, Valcour and Garden–all host otherworldly inhabitants, and unidentified creatures and objects have made appearances on the water, in the sky and in the forests surrounding the lake.
Buy Here

 

 

More About Lake Champlain’s Invasive Species:

LCBP Issues RFP for Training at Wastewater Treatment Facilities

LCBP Issues RFP for Training at Wastewater Treatment Facilities

Grand Isle, VT – The Lake Champlain Basin Program (LCBP) is pleased to announce a Request for Proposals (RFP) for services to operate a program of technical assistance in asset management, targeting governing boards, managers, and operators of small and medium-sized (less than 2.0 MGD) publicly-owned treatment plants in New York and Vermont. Up to $380,000 is available for this project.

Eric Howe, Technical Coordinator for the Lake Champlain Basin Program, said “The funds will be used to help wastewater treatment plant operators in the Lake Champlain Basin with facility management and planning. For example, facility managers will be working to reduce operating costs and phosphorus pollution to the Lake. They might also seek long term management strategies for the operation and maintenance of the facilities, including budgeting for upgrades.”

The successful applicant will deliver asset management training opportunities to small and medium sized wastewater treatment facilities in the New York and Vermont portions of the Lake Champlain watershed. The successful applicant will work with at least twelve facilities to develop asset management plans tailored to each facility, and provide assistance with implementation of these asset management plans.

This work is applicable to Chapter 4 of the LCBP’s long-term management plan – Opportunities for Action: An Evolving Plan for the Future of the Lake Champlain Basin. This project is supported by funds awarded to the New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission (NEIWPCC) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) in support of the Lake Champlain Basin Program.

This Request for Proposals is available from the Lake Champlain Basin Program website. Look for the link on our homepage at www.lcbp.org. Proposals are due May 12, 2016 by 4:30 p.m. To receive a copy of the RFP via U.S. Postal Service or for further information, contact the Lake Champlain Basin Program office at (802) 372-3213 or toll free at (800) 468-LCBP in New York and Vermont.

Ghosts and Legends of Lake Champlain
Lake Champlain is located between New York’s majestic Adirondacks and Vermont’s famed Green Mountains. Yet despite the beauty of this region, it has been the site of dark and mysterious events; it is not surprising that some spirits linger in this otherwise tranquil place. Fort Ticonderoga saw some of early America’s bloodiest battles, and American, French and British ghosts still stand guard.
Champlain’s islands–Stave, Crab, Valcour and Garden–all host otherworldly inhabitants, and unidentified creatures and objects have made appearances on the water, in the sky and in the forests surrounding the lake.
Buy Here

 

 

More Lake Champlain News:

 

Program Director – Lake Champlain Basin Program

Program Director – Lake Champlain Basin Program

Grand Isle, VT

The New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission (NEIWPCC) is seeking candidates for Program Director of the Lake Champlain Basin Program (LCBP.) The right candidate will have a proven track record of leading institutional growth and a team.

The incumbent will work to protect and improve the natural and cultural resources of the Lake Champlain Basin and its bi-state and bi-national watershed through partnerships that conserve and restore natural resources, promote the use of sound science to support management decisions, enhance water quality, and promote community involvement and stewardship. The incumbent will also administer the Champlain Valley National Heritage Partnership whose focus is increasing knowledge and appreciation of the area’s cultural heritage, outdoor recreational opportunities, and historic landmarks.  The incumbent will work with and provide leadership to the Lake Champlain Program and its operating committees, including the Lake Champlain Steering Committee, Executive Committee, Citizen Advisory Committees (VT, NY, QC), Education and Outreach Committee, Heritage Area Program Advisory Committee, and Technical Advisory Committee.

The incumbent is expected to have extensive interaction with the public and representatives of federal, state, and local governments, businesses, members of the local news media, universities and environmental and economic development organizations. The incumbent will oversee and manage LCBP operations and provide overall program leadership, coordination, administration, and planning.

Recommended qualifications are listed in the job description.  The incumbent is expected to have an extensive working knowledge of planning principles and implementation techniques related to lake use and water quality protection as well as biological, chemical, and physical water quality indicators. The incumbent is also expected to have demonstrated effective leadership and business management skills, the ability to mediate disparate opinions and negotiate acceptable solutions, and program management skills.

HOW TO APPLY

Refer to www.neiwpcc.org for a full position description. Submit cover letter, resume, and brief writing sample by April 29, 2016 via email at jobs@neiwpcc.org. Please reference 16-LCPB-004 in the email subject line.

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