Category Archives: News

News and events around the Lake Champlain Valley of northern New York and Vermont and southern Quebec

Vermont Watershed Grants

Vermont Watershed Grants

 

Vermont Watershed Grants supported by license plate sales

Vermonters have an opportunity to protect and restore watersheds through the Vermont Watershed Grants Program. Half of the proceeds derived from the sale of the Vermont Conservation License Plate go towards funding the Vermont Watershed Grants Program.

The Program is co-administered by DEC and the Department of Fish and Wildlife; and it distributes grant dollars for noteworthy local and regional water-related projects within Vermont. The other half of proceeds derived from the Conservation License Plate go towards helping the Vermont Non-Game and Natural Heritage Program.

 

Vermont Watershed Grants and Heavy equipment working on Wells River dam removal

If you’re interested, you can join their new mailing list to receive future announcements about the Watershed Grants Program. When you sign up to register, simply select “Watershed Grant Program announcements.”

Grant funds are available for water-related projects that:

  • Protect or restore fish and wildlife habitats
  • Protect or restore water quality, and shorelines;
  • Reduce phosphorus loading and/or sedimentation as part of DEC’s Clean Water Initiative objectives;
  • Enhance recreational use and enjoyment;
  • Identify and protect historic and cultural resources;
  • Educate people about watershed resources; or
  • Monitor fish and wildlife populations and/or water quality.

 

Who May Apply

A dozen or so people working on a streambank restoration. Vermont Watershed GrantsMunicipalities, local or regional governmental agencies, nonprofit organizations, and citizen groups are eligible to receive Watershed Grants for work on public or private lands. Individuals and state and federal agencies are not eligible to receive funds directly, but may be partners of a project.

 

Funding Categories

Watershed Grant:

Awards made up to $10,000, depending on project category type. Category types and the maximum grant amount for each project category type are as follows:

– Education and outreach – up to $5,000
– Planning, assessment, inventory, monitoring – up to $3,500
– On-the-ground implementation – up to $10,000

Watershed Grants Program dollars are intended for complete projects or for discreet, identifiable portions of larger projects.

Application Information

Grant awards are made on an annual cycle, with applications due in the fall of the year and funding decisions made the following mid-winter.

The 2017 Project Year grant application deadline is December 2, 2016. Persons interested in applying should consult and use the 2017 project year forms shown below.

A copy of the Grant Application Guide and the Grant Application may also be requested by contacting the Watershed Management Division.

 

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Missisquoi Bay Watershed Plan

Plan for Lakes, Rivers and Wetlands of the Missisquoi Bay Watershed

The lakes, rivers and wetlands of Lake Champlain’s Missisquoi Bay watershed provide recreational opportunities, drinking water and support for wildlife habitat and plant communities.  Water resource protection and remediation is necessary to ensure the community’s continued enjoyment of these uses.

Plan for Lakes, Rivers and Wetlands of the Missisquoi Bay Watershed

Karen Bates, Watershed Management Division basin planner, and partners in the watershed have assessed water resources, conducted high-resolution water quality modeling, and combed through every previous assessment to document projects to protect high quality waters and remediate where needed.  The result is the draft Missisquoi Bay Watershed Tactical Basin Plan, which is now ready for public review and comments.  The plan also contains a chapter on how the basin-scale allocations of the new Lake Champlain Total Maximum Daily Load(TMDL) are broken down into small geographic areas to assist communities and stakeholders in identifying the best locations to implement phosphorus reduction projects.  The following table outlines the plan objectives and strategies.

missisquoitable2

A series of three public meetings to learn more about the tactical basin plan and provide comments has been scheduled over the next month. The meetings are co-hosted by the Northwest Regional Planning Commission, the Northern Vermont Development Association, and the Lake Carmi Local Implementation Team. The schedule is:

  • November 9th, 6:00-8:00 pm, Georgia Fire Station, Georgia, VT (joint presentation with the Lamoille Plan)
  • November 14th, 6:00-8:00 pm, Jay Municipal Building, Jay, VT
  • November 17th, 5:00-7:00 pm, FELCO Community Room, Franklin Homestead, Franklin, VT

The draft tactical basin plans will be accessible via the Watershed Management Division’s basin planners and online.

The public comment period is November 1st through close of business (4:30 pm) on December 2nd.

For more information, contact Karen Bates by email or phone at (802) 490-6144.

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Lake Champlain Area Year-Round Trout Fishing

Lake Champlain Area Year-Round Trout Fishing

The “open season” for trout may be closed, but there are several stream sections where you can still fish for trout. Below are a listing of Lake Champlain tributaries where trout fishing is allowed year-round under the following conditions.
 

Lake Champlain Area Year-Round Trout Fishing

The sections of streams listed below are open to trout fishing year round according to the following rules:

  • Only artificial flies or lures may be used, except during the open season for trout (2nd Sat. in April – Oct. 31).
  • Catch and release only (trout must be immediately released where caught), except during the open season for trout.
  • During open season for trout, follow normal size restrictions, daily limits and possession limits.

 

Lake Champlain Tributaries

Lamoille River:

From the Lake Champlain boundary (top of Peterson Dam in Milton) upstream to the top of the Cady’s Falls Dam in Morristown.

Lewis Creek:

From the Lake Champlain boundary upstream to the State Prison Hollow Road (TH#3) bridge in Starksboro.

Missisquoi River:

From the top of the Swanton Dam in Swanton to the top of the Enosburg Falls Dam in Enosburg Falls.

Otter Creek:

From the Lake Champlain boundary upstream to the Danby-Mt. Tabor Forest Road bridge (Forest Road #10) in Mt. Tabor.

Winooski River:

From the Lake Champlain boundary upstream to the VT Route 2/100 in Duxbury and Waterbury.NOTE: Check specific stream sections in “Index of Rivers & Streams” for other regulations.

 

Other Vermont Streams to Fish for Trout Year-Round

Black River:

From the Connecticut River boundary upstream to the Howard Hill Road Bridge in Cavendish.

Deerfield River:

From the Woods Road (Medburyville) bridge in Wilmington upstream approximately 2 miles to the VT Route 9W bridge in Searsburg.

East Creek (Rutland City):

From the confluence with Otter Creek upstream (approximately 2.7 miles) to the top of the Patch Dam in Rutland City.

Hoosic River:

From the Vermont/New York border upstream to the Vermont/ Massachusetts border.

Moose River:

From the confluence with Passumpsic River upstream to the downstream edge of the Concord Avenue bridge in St. Johnsbury.

Ompompanoosuc River:

From the Connecticut River boundary upstream to the Union Village Dam in Thetford.

Passumpsic River:

From the Connecticut River boundary upstream to the top of Arnolds Falls Dam in St. Johnsbury.

Waits River:

From the Connecticut River boundary upstream to the top of the Central Vermont Power Dam (Green Power Mountain Dam) in Bradford.

Walloomsac River:

From the Vermont/New York border in Bennington upstream to the top of the former Vermont Tissue Plant Dam (downstream of Murphy Road) in Bennington.

West River:

From the Connecticut River boundary upstream to the Townshend Dam in Townshend.

White River:

From the Connecticut River boundary upstream to the bridge on Route 107 in Bethel.

Williams River:

From the Connecticut River boundary upstream to the top of the dam at Brockway Mills Falls in Rockingham.

 

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Injured Bald Eagle Released Back into the Wild

Injured Bald Eagle Released Back into the Wild

Staff with the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department and Vermont Institute of Natural Sciences released a juvenile bald eagle back into the wild last week at Dead Creek Wildlife Management Area in Addison, Vermont.

The young eagle was injured when it fell from its nest early this summer. A local wildlife photographer notified the landowner and Fish & Wildlife staff that the eagle was injured. The bird was initially treated at the Outreach for Earth Stewardship rehabilitation facility in Shelburne, and then transferred to the Vermont Institute for Natural Science in Quechee to complete its rehabilitation. Biologists attached special identification bands to the eagle’s legs before releasing it to the wild.

“This release is a great moment for eagle restoration in Vermont,” said Fish & Wildlife bird biologist John Buck. “This day would not be possible without the dedicated efforts of the many people who care deeply about restoring the bald eagle to its rightful place among Vermont’s wildlife community.”

Bald eagles declined nationwide due to loss of habitat and the effects of the pesticide DDT. Laws protecting eagles, such as the Clean Water Act, the Endangered Species Act, and a ban on DDT have aided in the recovery of the United States’ national symbol.

According to Buck, Vermont’s bald eagle population is in the midst of a strong recovery. He cites continued support from the public through funding wildlife programs like the Nongame Wildlife Fund and maintaining a safe distance from nesting eagles, in addition to the work of conservation partners, as critical to the species’ continued recovery in Vermont.

 

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