Tag Archives: Canoe/Kayak

New Lake Champlain Blueway Trail Guide Available Online

New Lake Champlain Blueway Trail Guide Available

New Lake Champlain Blueway Trail Guide Available Online

 

A recreational water path extending the length of Lake Champlain’s New York shoreline from Whitehall to Rouses Point, the Lake Champlain Blueway Trail is a guide for paddlers featuring more than 90 points of interests including: parks, wildlife viewing spots, geological curiosities, historic sites, museums, and campgrounds.

Explore the Lake Champlain Adirondack Coast through the Lake Champlain Blueway Trail. This online travel guide provides historical information, recreational opportunities, paddling tips, boat launches, docking locations, and marinas.

Intended primarily for use by paddlers, it can also be used by those in larger boats and those who travel frozen Lake Champlain in the winter. The Blueway Trail is organized into 16 segments, each intended as a separate day trip.

The entire Blueway Trail Guide can be found online at Blueway Trail Guide. Each of the sections is explored briefly below. You may also access each of the sections individually by clicking the name of that section below.

Rouses Point to the Great Chazy River:

Lake Champlain History - Fort Montgomery (Fort Blunder)

Fort Montgomery (Fort Blunder)

 

Before you begin, north of the Village of Rouses Point is Fort Montgomery, nicknamed Fort Blunder.

Start in the Village of Rouses Point and continue down and around the historic Point au Fer. From here, paddlers have an uninterrupted view down the lake following the marshy shore. At Kings Bay Wildlife Management Area, you can observe the abundant wildlife up to the mouth of the Great Chazy River.

Great Chazy River to Point au Roche:

Snow geese at Montys Bay Wildlife Management Area

Snow geese at Montys Bay WMA

Along this shallow and marshy shoreline, paddlers will pass historic Chazy Landing and have access to Montys Bay Wildlife Management Area for wildlife viewing, hunting, and fishing.

Point au Roche to Cumberland Head:

Point Au Roche Lighthouse

Point Au Roche Lighthouse

Paddlers can enjoy the view of the Point Au Roche Lighthouse, a series of beautiful bays, and have access to Point Au Roche State Park with its sandy beach, swimming area, and network of trails.

 

Port Kent to Cumberland Bay:

This Lake Champlain Blueway Trail route begins in Port Kent and continues through two different wildlife management areas, Wickham Marsh WMA and Ausable Marsh WMA, both of which offer excellent wetland wildlife viewing opportunities. This segment is “hallowed waters,” the site of several naval battles that were fought to control Lake Champlain over 200 years ago. The route ends at the Plattsburgh City Beach, which is adjacent to Cumberland Bay State Park. Recommended to paddle from south to north.

 

Valcour and Crab Islands:

The Valcour and Crab islands trail guides you around one of Lake Champlain’s largest and most historic islands and its smaller neighbor. Explore the many bays and points along the islands. You can also learn about the best places to explore the islands on foot at this PassagePort. Valcour has a number of primitive campsites.

 

Port Kent to Willsboro:

Schuyler Island - Lake Champlain Islands

Schuyler Island pebble beach

Begin this paddle in the hamlet of Port Kent, explore Schuyler Island, and continues south to the historic hamlet of Port Douglas, where you will find a sandy beach and swimming area before continuing on to Willsboro Bay.

Willsboro Bay to the Four Brothers Islands:

Four Brothers Islands on Lake Champlain with Vermont in background.

This segment of the Lake Champlain Blueway Trail begins in the picturesque Willsboro Bay and takes paddlers around Willsboro Point, out to the Four Brothers Islands with unparalleled bird watching opportunities, ending near the mouth of the beautiful Boquet River.

Boquet River:

A paddle up this river is a trip through history, ending at the hamlet of Willsboro, where shopping, dining, and other recreational opportunities are plentiful.

 

Westport (Split Rock) to Essex:

Split Rock

Explore the section of the lake known as “The Narrows,” named for the obvious reason that this is the narrowest part of the lake, rich in history and natural beauty. Paddlers can pick through the many harbors and points along this shoreline, including the unique “Palisades of Lake Champlain,” a geological masterpiece of sheer cliffs ornamented with waterfalls and wildlife.

This segment ends in the hamlet of Essex, with shopping, dining, and parks to enjoy. It is recommended that this segment be completed south to north.

Port Henry to Westport:

Cole Island

Cole Island

This route begins in the Village of Port Henry and passes a number of iron-history sites along the shoreline, including a once-industrious brook and Cole Island believed to be where Father Isaac Jogues, a famous Jesuit missionary was tortured while held captive by the Mohawks.

The route ends in the town of Westport, where paddlers have access to shopping, dining, parks, and a beach and swimming area. It is recommended that this segment be completed south to north.

Crown Point and Port Henry:

Five Museum Tour

Crown Point Barracks

Paddlers can put in at Crown Point State Historic Site, the location of two separate forts under different sovereigns. Nearby are campgrounds, a historic lighthouse and pier, boat launch, and museum.  The route continues along Bulwagga Bay, and then onward to the village of Port Henry with shopping and dining, parks, beaches, campgrounds, and a museum that showcases the town’s mining and iron ore heritage.

Crown Point to Monitor Bay:

This short segment consists of marshes, resulting in a vibrant and diverse habitat of plants and animals. Paddlers can explore Putts Creek Wildlife Management Area before reaching the Town of Crown Point’s Monitor Bay Park and Marina. It is a short walk from here to a bank, stores, and restaurants.

 

Monitor Bay to Ticonderoga:

Explore a narrow and marshy shoreline of the lake that is almost river-like. Wildlife is abundant here, especially birds and waterfowl.

 

Ticonderoga and La Chute River:

Fort Ticonderoga

Fort Ticonderoga

Paddlers get a terrific view of Fort Ticonderoga and its impressive grounds on this segment. The strategic importance of this fort was its location at the mouth of La Chute River, which is the waterway that connects Lake Champlain to Lake George. From Fort Ticonderoga, it is smooth water to downtown Ticonderoga.

Ticonderoga to Chubbs Dock:

Paddlers will start near Fort Ticonderoga, passing through the narrowest point in the lake. The southern part of Lake Champlain has been referred to as the “drowned lands” because it is surround by wetlands, rich with wildlife.

 

Whitehall to South Bay (Chubbs Dock):

South Bay

Lake Champlain’s South Bay

This segment begins in historic Whitehall, the birthplace of the American Navy, and brings paddlers through the waters that became a murky grave for a number of Revolutionary War ships.

The trail also explores South Bay, which offers paddlers ample wildlife viewing opportunities. It is recommended that this segment be completed south to north.

Expanding on one of these day trips, Lakes to Locks has also produced a detailed audio and web tour of Valcour and Crab Islands, which includes paddling information as well as in-depth history and a guided walking tour of Valcour.

The Valcour and Crab Island PassagePort is a mobile-enhanced tour that draws from the expertise of historians, experienced paddlers, and others.

Mid-November Kayaking on Lake Champlain 

Mid-November Kayaking on Lake Champlain
Mid -November Kayaking on Lake Champlain

I had just returned from paddleboarding this beautiful afternoon and noticed a kayaker was also enjoying the solitude of this November afternoon on Lake Champlain in Alburgh, Vermont.

 

Other Lake Champlain Wildlife Articles:

A Paddling Long Trail: The Northern Forest Canoe Route

The Northern Forest Canoe Route

Various parts of the Trail are appropriate for paddlers of every level of expertise from novice to expert. My canoe buddies and I have paddled many of the sections in the Adirondacks, a few in Vermont. Our favorite Vermont trip is a spring paddle in the Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge where the Missisquoi River enters Lake Champlain. One day we saw over 100 nests and their occupants – Great Blue Herons and Cormorants nesting in the trees in the river delta. From the mouth of the river in Vermont, the view shed of the Adirondack Mountains as they tower over the lake is spectacular. The Trail from New York to Vermont crosses Lake Champlain from the Saranac River in Plattsburgh to the mouth of the Missisquoi River near Swanton.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.adirondackalmanack.com

See on Scoop.itLake Champlain Life

Northern Forest Canoe Trail reroutes portage path near Saranac River

Northern Forest Canoe Trail reroutes portage  

Last summer, the Northern Forest Canoe Trail (NFCT) and Enel Green Power North America (EGP-NA) created a campsite and re-routed a canoe carry along the Saranac River in Plattsburgh, New York. The new portage provides a safer way for paddlers to bypass Treadwell Mills Dam and Fredenburgh Falls.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: news.google.com

See on Scoop.itLake Champlain Life

 

 


Guns Over The Champlain Valley:
A Guide To Historic Military Sites And Battlefields
(Paperback)
Author: Coffin, Howard

The Champlain Valley is one of the most historically rich regions of the country. Fort Ticonderoga, Saratoga, Fort William Henry, Crown Point, Plattsburgh, Bennington and Valcour Island all lie along the ancient warpath that is the Champlain Corridor.
In this lively and informative new travel guide to historic places and events, the author leads you to each venue, describing the events and their long-lasting impact.  Adventure awaits you with Guns over the Champlain Valley.
Order Today

 

More Lake Champlain News:

 

Canoeing at Dusk on Lake Champlain

Canoeing at Dusk on Lake Champlain

Canoeing at dusk on Lake Champlain.
Photo by Tom McHugh 

Dusk can be a great time for canoeing. The lake is usually very calm, there is little motorized activity on the lake and, if you’re lucky, the bugs haven’t become too active yet. This photo of two neighbors paddling at sunset was one of those perfect times.

Lake Champlain offers many excellent opportunities for canoeing at dusk, dawn or any other time. Because the weather can change quickly on Lake Champlain, any boaters should pay careful attention to changing conditions.

 

Other Lake Champlain Canoeing Articles: