Tag Archives: Historic Sites

Lake Champlain Historic Sites

Ethan Allen Homestead Museum

Ethan Allen Homestead

Ethan Allen’s Burlington Home 1787-1789

Ethan Allen Homestead

Ethan Allen Homestead

In Burlington Vermont’s’s Intervale, on a small rise above the Winooski River – safe from the reach of flood waters – is a small “Cape Cod” style house. Although modern siding makes it look quite ordinary, this house has stood for over 200 years. This modest farm-house was the last home of General Ethan Allen, Vermont’s Revolutionary War hero and leader of the Green Mountain Boys. It was built by him, and it’s where he died.

Just a short drive from Burlington, Vermont’s downtown the Ethan Allen Homestead Museum offers hands-on history, spectacular scenery along with riverside picnic areas and walks. The Homestead offers a view of 18th century life, and an intimate look at Vermont’s most colorful – and controversial founder Ethan Allen and his wife, Fanny.

 

Ethan Allen Homestead: The Early Years

Ethan Allen in his later yearsEthan Allen was fifty years old when he came to Burlington in 1787 to take up farming. Until 1777 Ethan Allen’s family had lived at Sheffield, Connecticut. They moved to Vermont while he was a prisoner of war during the Revolutionary War, and settled in Sunderland that year. Mary Bronson Allen, Ethan’s first wife, died in 1783. In 1784 he met Frances (Fanny) Buchanan and they married later that year.

 

On February 11, 1789 he and his hired man, Newport, drove his oxen over the ice to South Hero for a load of hay from his cousin Ebenezer Allen. Returning early the next morning, Ethan Allen unexpectedly died.

 

Ethan Allen Homestead: Later Years

After his death Ethan Allen’s widow sold Ethan’s Intervale farm in 1814 to Cornelius P. Van Ness. For the rest of the 19th century it would be known as the Van Ness farm.

 

Ethan Allen Tower

The Tower in Ethan Allen Park

The Van Ness family continued in possession of the farm until 1862 when it was to Alfred Brookes of New York City. In 1902 William J. Van Patten bought it from Brookes.

Van Patten set apart about 12 acres and offered it to the Sons of the American Revolution on condition that a stone tower, a memorial to General Ethan Allen, be erected on the top of the ledge and a road built leading to the tower and to Ethan’s former house. The S.A.R. built and dedicated the present tower in 1905.

 

By 1914 the farm was run by Van Patten as a dairy farm. And in that year a large fire destroyed its barns, no doubt the original ones built by Allen in 1787. Ethan Allen Park with its monumental stone tower became a landmark in Burlington and overshadowed the modest little wooden house standing nearby on private land on the Intervale, nearly forgotten.

This was how matters still stood in 1974 when Ralph Nading Hill, while working on a book on Lake Champlain, took an interest in the small house, which was still lived in, and decided to confirm its identity. A committee, including experts from the Shelburne Museum, visited the site and determined the authenticity of the basic structural features of the building. Although the interior was remodeled, and an ell and new exterior added, physical evidence confirmed that it was the original Ethan Allen house.

 

Ethan Allen Homestead: Today

Ethan Allen Homestead

Ethan Allen Homestead

The Ethan Allen Homestead Museum is at 1 Ethan Allen Homestead, Burlington, VT 05408, and is open seven days a week for General Tours May 1st to October 31st from 10 a.m. to  4 p.m.
Group and School Tours are available on request

Admission Prices:

  • Individual: $10
  • Seniors: $9
  • Students 5-17: $6
  • Children under 5: free
Ethan Allen Homestead inside

Inside Ethan Allen Homestead

Learn more about Ethan Allen in Ethan Allen: His Life and Times by Willard Sterne Randall. It tells the story of Allen’s life from growing up in frontier Connecticut, through the early years of the Green Mountain Boys in the New Hampshire Grants, the capture of Fort Ticonderoga, and Allen’s capture by the British at Montreal, through to the founding of the Republic of Vermont and its eventual statehood.

Other Lake Champlain Points of Interest:

Weird New England
Joe Citro's classic look at local legends and oddities from all over New England.
Click on the image above to buy this book today

Five Museums Tour

Five Museums Tour

Five Museums Tour

Crown Point Barracks

This special tour reveals the long history of the area around the Lake Champlain Bridge on Saturday, September 17, 2016.

You’ll visit Chimney Point State Historic Site, John Strong DAR Museum, Crown Point State Historic Site, Penfield Museum, and Port Henry Iron Center.

Tour begins at 10:00 at Chimney Point. Pre-registration recommended. Call for details and fee. Vermont Archaeology Month Program

Contact: 802-759-2412

Event Date:

Saturday, September 17, 2016

10:00 am to 3:00 pm

Lake Champlain

This 128-page softcover book features stunning historical images from the archives of Lake Champlain Maritime Museum and other regional collections, and includes chapters on Patriotic Sites and Celebrations; Commerce in the Canal Era; The Age of Steam; Crossing Lake Champlain; Recreational Boating; Summer and Summer Folk; Hunting and Fishing; and Winter. ‘Lake Champlain’ tells the story of this historic, busy commercial corridor and recreational destination.

Buy Here

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Crown Point State Historic Site Museum, Bird Banding Station open

Crown Point State Historic Site Museum, Bird Banding Station  open

The Crown Point State Historic Site Museum and Bird Banding Station will open for the 2016 season Saturday, May 7.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.suncommunitynews.com

The Crown Point peninsula, jutting northward into Lake Champlain, serves as a trap for birds migrating north making it an ideal location for the banding station. 18,604 individual birds have been banded at this station since 1976 representing 106 different species of birds including 28 different species of colorful warblers. The Museum will be open from Saturday, May 7 to Monday, Oct. 17, Thursdays to Mondays from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

See on Scoop.itLake Champlain Life

The Sinking of the General Butler

The Sinking of the General Butler – a video with Art Cohn

In this video Art Cohn, founding director of the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum, tells the exciting story of the sinking of the General Butler, which sank in the Burlington harbor over a hundred years ago.

 

About the General Butler

The General Butler was built in 1862 in Essex, New York. The boat was named after Benjamin Butler, a Massachusetts lawyer and businessman. Who was also a general during the Civil War. General Butler fought in some important battles at the start of the war. The ship was a typical Lake Champlain sailing canal boat – designed to sail on the lake and when masts were removed and centerboard raised, could travel though the Champlain Canal.

She was under the command of her third owner, Captain William Montgomery of Isle La Motte on her last voyage on December 9, 1876 when a powerful winter gale struck while sailing up the lake. Upon approaching Burlington, the Butler‘s steering mechanism broke. The captain rigged a tiller bar to the steering post in an attempt to maneuver the ship around the breakwater. But the attempt was unsuccessful and the schooner crashed into the breakwater. The force of the water was so great that the craft was repeatedly lifted on top of the ice-covered stones. One by one each of the ship’s crew made the perilous jump onto the breakwater. The captain was the last to leave the ship which immediately sank into the 40’ of water where she now rests.

sinking of the General Butler

Sonar image of General Butler. from LCMM

After narrowly escaping death by drowning, the Butler‘s survivors now risked freezing to death on the breakwater. They all would have perished but for the heroic intervention of Burlington ship chandler James Wakefield and his son, who rowed out in a 14’ boat and took all five to safety. The Butler was declared a total loss. Artifacts from the General Butler are now on display at the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum’s Basin Harbor facility.

 

 

Lake Champlain

This 128-page softcover book features stunning historical images from the archives of Lake Champlain Maritime Museum and other regional collections, and includes chapters on Patriotic Sites and Celebrations; Commerce in the Canal Era; The Age of Steam; Crossing Lake Champlain; Recreational Boating; Summer and Summer Folk; Hunting and Fishing; and Winter. ‘Lake Champlain’ tells the story of this historic, busy commercial corridor and recreational destination.

Buy Here

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Crown Point / Chimney Point Historic Region

Crown Point / Chimney Point Historic Region by James P. Millard

Crown Point / Chimney Point Historic Region

Crown Point / Chimney Point Historic Region

Information about the historic Crown Point/Chimney Point region of Vermont and New York State on Lake Champlain

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.historiclakes.org

The Crown Point/Chimney Point peninsulas on Lake Champlain are some of the most historic places in the area. Long recognized as places of strategic importance on this waterway through the wilderness, each side of the lake was inhabited and fortified from earliest times. Chimney Point was the site of Fort de Pieux, a simple wooden stockade built by the French; and is now the site of a historic brick tavern owned by the State of Vermont and operated as Chimney Point Historic Site.

Opposite Chimney Point, across the great steel bridge, is Crown Point. This historic location was the site of an important French fort, St. Frederic; and an enormous British Fortress, known simply as ‘His Majesty’s Fort at Crown Point’. It was not known as Fort Crown Point, nor was it called Fort Amherst, as some early sources claim. The Crown Point peninsula played a critical role in the French and Indian War and the American Revolution. The ruins there are maintained by the New York State Department of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. The park is known as Crown Point State Historic Site. The park includes the ruins of both fortresses, a number of important redoubts, and the beautiful Champlain Memorial Lighthouse on the site of the earlier Grenadier’s Redoubt.

Any visit to the historic lakes should include a trip to this remarkably historic and beautiful site.

See on Scoop.itLake Champlain Life


Guns Over The Champlain Valley:
A Guide To Historic Military Sites And Battlefields
(Paperback)
Author: Coffin, Howard

The Champlain Valley is one of the most historically rich regions of the country. Fort Ticonderoga, Saratoga, Fort William Henry, Crown Point, Plattsburgh, Bennington and Valcour Island all lie along the ancient warpath that is the Champlain Corridor.
In this lively and informative new travel guide to historic places and events, the author leads you to each venue, describing the events and their long-lasting impact.  Adventure awaits you with Guns over the Champlain Valley.
Order Today

 

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